DCSIMG

Foodbanks “shame” blasted

Graeme Dey

Graeme Dey

Latest figures showing the number of adults and children turning to foodbanks in Angus have been branded a “shameful indictment” of Westminster’s coalition government.

SNP MSP Graeme Dey made the comments after The Trussell Trust revealed the number of people using foodbanks in Scotland has increased by a staggering 400 per cent, to 71,428.

In Angus alone the figure stands at 1,238 of which 276 are children.

The Angus South MSP said he was appalled by the findings and commented: “It is staggering that in the 21st century we have thousands of people relying on foodbanks across Scotland.

“But this is the grim reality of Westminster’s cuts - Scottish foodbanks going from providing aid to 14,318 people in 2012/13 to 71,428 in 2013/14.

“What is particularly distressing is that more than 30% of this number is made up of children.

“These figures are a shameful indictment of Westminster government.”

The Trussell Trust says benefit changes, benefit delays and low income are the key causes of people in Scotland seeking support from foodbanks.

At the recent SNP Conference, Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced a £1 million package of support for foodbanks that will help them to provide the aid that many people are now relying upon.

Mr Dey added: “Foodbanks should not be needed in Scotland.

“It does not have to be this way and this September we have the chance to vote for something different, an opportunity to do things better.

“The Scottish government is doing what it can to mitigate Westminster’s actions. That is why the SNP has announced a £1 million package of support for foodbanks.

“But what Scotland really needs is to have the rights to manage all of our affairs, including making our own decisions on tax and welfare, so that people are no longer relying on foodbanks.

“With a Yes vote in September, we will be able to ensure that Scotland’s tax and welfare system reflects the priorities of the people.”

 

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