Manics back in force after two-year ‘rest’

It's been a bit of a working holiday for Manic Street Preachers' Nicky Wire, James Dean Bradfield and Sean Moore. Courtesy of PA Photo/ALex Lake.

It's been a bit of a working holiday for Manic Street Preachers' Nicky Wire, James Dean Bradfield and Sean Moore. Courtesy of PA Photo/ALex Lake.

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Iconic Welsh trio Manic Street Preachers are back after a well-earned two year break.

It doesn’t appear to have been much of a holiday as James Dean Bradfield, Nicky Wire and Sean Moore are back with a vengeance showcasing their 11th studio album, ‘Rewind The Film’, a string of live shows and their 12th album already recorded and in the bag pegged for release next year.

Singer James Dean Bradfield talked about the Manics’ work ethic. He said: “We always knew it was going to be hard to be away. The word ‘institutionalised’ carries negative connotations, but we are, we’re institutionalised within the Manics; having something to aim for, being organised, having a schedule, deadlines, we love it.

“We’re very disciplined like that. And if you’ve written songs you love, it’s difficult not to want to play them to people.

“We nearly made it two years without playing a show in the UK, so that’s not so bad.”

You only have to listen to the new album to understand why there is so much commitment to the band, the chemistry is in huge abundance.

Unlike previous album ‘Postcards From A Young Man’, which was full of the grandiose political statements, huge string arrangements and rousing choruses that have become one of their signatures, ‘Rewind The Film’ is much smaller in scale and introspective in theme.

But what does this mean for a band who have railed against consumerism, government and classism for nearly 30 years?

James asked: “Is that introspection now outweighing any of the traditional angers and passions that we might have had?

“We have been true to how old we feel sometimes, and this record is exactly that. It’s filled with self-doubt and the creep of mortality, but there’s a song on there called ‘30 Year War’, which is one the easiest songs we’ve ever written.

“It shows we are still quintessentially the same band, occasionally engaging in politics, asking the same questions and really enjoying doing it.”

Looking to next year, album ‘Futurology’ is due in May and again could be a bit of a departure for the Manics. James said: “The next album feels different, more Germanic, it’s really good but we’re going to have to understate the release of it. It’s not an easy pitch.

“That said, this one’s not easy either; I can hear the TV advert now - ‘Filled with a sense of self-doubt, mortality and the oncoming creep of one’s tender years - 12 new songs from the Manic Street Preachers’. We’ve never made things easy for ourselves, so let’s not start now.”