Sweet taste of ‘Freedom’ for Rebecca Ferguson

Rebecca Ferguson has had her share of woes, but with a new album and a tour next year she is back on track. Picture courtesy PA / Photohandout.
Rebecca Ferguson has had her share of woes, but with a new album and a tour next year she is back on track. Picture courtesy PA / Photohandout.

Rebecca Ferguson has always been a fighter and it looks like that has at last paid off for the X Factor runner-up who has had her share of dramas.

She came runner-up to Matt Cardle in the seventh series of X Factor, and her debut album has sold over a million copies globally, but she has had to battle for every inch.

Ferguson had a difficult childhood, raised by her mother until she was too unwell to look after her, she then spent time with family friends, foster parents and care homes.

In her teens Ferguson became a single mother herself, but she continued to strive for better for her family, her dream of stardom bubbling in the background as she tried to get on various talent shows.

Then in 2010 she made it on to the X Factor and released her hugely successful debut ‘Heaven’.

But this was not the end of her fight as her fame led to another set of problems.

“I started attracting really bad people,” she says. “I came off The X Factor and had all these clingers-on, trying to be mates with me. But because I was so trusting and shy, when people said they wanted to be my friend, I went along with it and they ended up completely using me, really.”

She continued: “They attempted to ruin me, basically. They wanted to destroy me. These people were fixated like stalkers. But not stalkers in the sense they just wanted to be near me, this was destructive. And I’d get threatening mail, to the point where I was petrified in my own house.”

Now free of all these issues Ferguson has released her follow-up album, tellingly titled, ‘Freedom’.

She says it was her naivety that got her into trouble in the first place, and admits that she had no idea just how successful she was when ‘Heaven’ was selling so well.

“I thought everyone sold a million records,” she says, although her main crime was not realising the record industry could be a fickle business. “I thought everyone loved everyone, and I quickly learned that wasn’t the case,” she says. “It’s all about making money and being well-connected. It’s cut-throat. I didn’t know that because I’d come from singing in my bedroom, dreaming of making it.”

Ferguson admits she has become more judgemental as a result, but is keen that her negative experiences don’t affect her too much.

She said: “I want to work with people who think about what I want, and want me to be happy and want my opinion. That’s got me a reputation for being difficult, and people don’t like working with difficult people. They want puppets, but I won’t do that. Now, there are loads of people who think I’m some uncontrollable Scouse crazy lady!”